Breakout Sessions

Breakout Sessions

 **PLEASE NOTE: ALL BREAKOUT SESSIONS ARE CLOSED TO THE MEDIA**

Breakout 1:
Research To Examine Behavioral Responses to AVs

The goal of the session is to identify research needs and develop research approaches (both quantitative and qualitative) for gaining deep insight on behavioral responses to AVs in three priority areas: (1) vehicle ownership and use choices, (2) land use choices, where people choose to live and work, and (3) activity and travel choices, what people do, how often, how they get there. End Product: A synthesis document describing a 3-5 year “research roadmap” of behavioral studies that identifies priority areas of research and associated research questions, and outlines “best practice” research approaches to obtain deep behavioral insights and address questions of interest.

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Breakout 2.1:
Judging a Car by its Cover: Human Factors Implications for Automated Vehicle External Communication

Currently road users communicate with one another in numerous ways. They communicate through eye contact, hand gestures, turn signals, horns, and even the control of their movement to show intent (e.g. easing vehicle forward). Uncertainty exists as to whether highly automated vehicles (HAVs) will be able to perceive and communicate intent in the same ways that a human can. Therefore, we should design HAVs to signal their intent in ways other roadway users can reliably understand. This session will bring together professionals to discuss “How” HAVs should communicate with all roadway users, “What” information is needed to communicate, and to what degree standardization of HAV external communication could be valuable. The session will provide presentations from experts currently researching this area. In addition, there will be breakout exercises to further explore use cases of HAVs and their interactions with other vehicles and vulnerable road users and how the application of human factors design principles could lead to potential solutions to these challenges.

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Breakout 2.2:
Automated Vehicle Challenges: How can Human Factors Research Help Inform Designers, Road Users, and Policy Makers?

The purpose of the session is to provoke a lively discussion among industry, government, and academic experts with broad perspectives of the likely consequences that various levels of vehicle automation will have for humans adapting to these new technologies. We have deliberately sought experts outside of the usual human factors research community in an effort to understand those indirect effects that extend beyond immediate issue of vehicle control and operation. Indeed, we expect automation may alter how people have traditionally thought about mobility. Such changes will have likely consequences on the behavior of all road users.

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Breakout 3:
Enabling Technologies for Automated Vehicles

Vehicle automation has captured the hearts and minds of many, and the resulting prospect and promise of safety, mobility, convenience, comfort and a plethora of other potential benefits is indeed exciting. Just as exciting and crucial to envisioned applications are the enabling technologies that will literally and figuratively be under the hood.

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Breakout 4:
An AV Crashes: What Happens Next?

The goal of the session is to better understand what will happen immediately after an AV crash. A panel of experts will use multiple AV crash scenarios to offer perspectives on this new topic. We will hear from law enforcement, insurance experts, products liability lawyers on the plaintiffs’ and defense side, transportation policy experts, and expert witnesses in automotive engineering. Topics will include how each of these different disciplines will use the new kinds of data that AVs provide, as well as the impact of this new technology on existing liability laws. We will assess all the stakeholders and their roles and consider their first steps after an AV crash in two lively, interactive panel discussions using different crash scenarios.

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Breakout 5:
Public Transport and Shared Mobility

This two-day session seeks to address how vehicle automation technology can be harnessed across public transport and shared mobility services in order to provide mobility for all. How will vehicle automation disrupt traditional transit systems, what new and different types of market-driven or publicly-run services are emerging, and how should public transport perform in the future?

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Breakout 6:
Trucking Automation: Key Deployment Scenarios

The objective of this breakout session is to address key challenges and opportunities in the deployment of on-road truck automation. The session starts with a set of presentations providing an overview of the current state of the art of automated trucks and identifying key deployment issues. This sets the stage for two panels with key stakeholders focusing on platooning and highway automation applications respectively. The second day is devoted to two deep dive sessions. The first addresses a specific use case for automated trucking with a freight carrier and their customer. The second deep dive discusses the application and deployment of Localizing Ground Penetrating Radar technologies to military vehicles and automated trucks.

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Breakout 7:
Enterprise Solutions Series

This session gives symposium benefactors and exhibitors the opportunity to present on the latest technology developments, partnership opportunities and other happenings in the industry. Attendees will hear from the companies and organizations shaping the future of transportation.

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Breakout 8:
Urbanism Next Workshop: AV’s Effects on Urban Development

This half-day workshop/charette will bring together engineers, urban designers, planners, architects, and real estate professionals to investigate automated vehicles effects on land use, physical city design, urban densification or sprawl, and changes in local vitality and activity. Participants will work in focused groups, developing scenarios of how different areas of cities might shift with this new technology. This will include looking at potential shifts in the urban core and more suburban contexts.

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Breakout 9:
Effects of Vehicle Automation on Energy-Usage and Emissions

The goal of the session is to provide a forum for an exploration on the current issues being investigated, by the profession, on the subjects pertaining to the potential energy and emissions implications of automation technology, in the transportation sector. Also, to provide an open forum for discussion of these and other issues among the current investigators/researchers, industry, regulators and interested parties.

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Breakout 10:
Data Sharing Models and Policy

Data exchange amongst various private and public sector entities is critical for successful widespread adoption of automated vehicles (AV). This session will explore governance models and implementation challenges related to data collection, storage, and access. Two panels will focus specifically on data sharing related to (1) safety and performance and (2) operations and infrastructure, and answer questions such as: What are the value exchanges between various public and private entities that incentivize sharing? What types, formats, and granularity of data are needed to achieve desired benefits? How can public agencies best prepare data infrastructure and policy to be ready for AVs? How can AV data be shared while protecting proprietary and liability concerns? What data standards are needed to support data sharing, and what is the role of public vs. private sector in developing and enforcing these standards?

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Breakout 11:
Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) for Automated Vehicles (AV): Exploring Tools, Algorithms, and Emerging Issues

Autonomous driving relies on in-vehicle computers that emulate the functions of a human brain in making informed decisions. Such systems employ artificial intelligence and sophisticated machine learning methods to support object tracking and various pattern recognition capabilities. This session will provide an overview of applications that utilize Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning tools supporting critical autonomous vehicles functions, as well as highlight emerging issues and challenges to overcome with such advanced computing tools.

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Breakout 12:
Testing Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs): Accelerating Innovation, Integration, Deployment and Sharing Results

Description This session will explore opportunities and best practices regarding connected and automated vehicles (CAV) testing throughout the industry. CAVs offer the promise of improved safety and performance, compared to the current human driver paradigm. Both closed course and open road testing are critical components of technology evaluation, improvement, integration and acceptance. Diversity of testing sites and attributes will multiply the scenarios tested and mitigate operating risk once the technology is implemented. The USDOT has cited acceleration of learning and development expected from the mandatory Community of Practice within their Automated Vehicle Proving Ground Pilot Program.

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Breakout 13:
Challenges and Opportunities for the Intersection of Vulnerable Road Users (VRU) and AVs

The primary goals of the session is to raise awareness of the safety and mobility needs of physically vulnerable road users (e.g., pedestrians, bicyclists, and people with disabilities) as they share roadways with partially and highly automated vehicles (HAVs). This is crucial to the safe and accepted development of HAV systems, as it will encourage roadway designers, AV developers, and policy makers to consider the needs of the entire traveling population. We will discuss existing, ongoing, and needed research to improve safety for VRUs when interacting with AVs, with a particular focus on technological issues, and we will generate discussion about technical and policy barriers and opportunities to enhance VRU safety and mobility as they interact with AVs.

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Breakout 14:
Enhancing the Validity of Traffic Flow Models with Emerging Data

This breakout session provides an opportunity to bring together the cyber-physical, communications, vehicle and traffic flow communities to better understand the fundamental characteristics of traffic flow with varying levels of automation and identify the research needs for developing models to assess real-world mobility and environmental sustainability implications of connected automated vehicles (CAV). This breakout session will focus on discussion of innovative traffic flow modeling techniques and simulation tools to quantify the mobility and environment impacts of CAV and their implications on highway capacity and freeway operations and designs. Special attention will be given to insights into behavioral differences in terms of lane-changing (lane choice, lane change execution) and car-following (following gap, reaction time, acceleration distribution) maneuvers and validation of existing and new CAV traffic flow models according to empirical data from CAV field tests.

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Breakout 15:
CAV Scenarios for High-Speed, Controlled Access Facilities

This session will focus on scenario planning for CAV (Connected and Automated Vehicles) on freeways and managed lanes. Through a series of presentations and break-out group discussions, dialogue with audience participants will be a critical component as we explore specific scenario development with operational and real-world implementation issues at the forefront. This session is being developed with joint involvement from Freeway Operations, ITS, Managed Lanes, Highway Capacity and Quality of Service, and Traffic Control Device Committees. The goals of this session are: 1) Discussion of likely CAV scenarios for high-speed, controlled access facilities. 2) Identification of infrastructure needs (roadway & ITS) to support the CAV scenarios. 3) Identification of near term implementation opportunities. 4)Discussion and identification of research needs.

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Breakout 16:
Aftermarket Systems (ADAS- related)

The goal of the session is to better understand the role that aftermarket systems may play in accelerating the deployment of automated vehicles. Aftermarket systems can accelerate deployment of automated vehicles while providing safety benefits with a viable business model. Examples of aftermarket systems may include those that provide collision avoidance warnings, train computer vision algorithms, or transmit and receive V2V messages. The session will bring together speakers from technology startups and established Tier 1 suppliers to discuss the benefits and challenges associated with aftermarket system deployment. Consideration will be given to the business model as well, since aftermarket systems cannot expect to be mandated by government.

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Breakout 17:
Safety Assurance

Safety Assurance of Automated Vehicle (SAAV) is a still unsolved problem for introduction of automated driving. In 2016, AVS experts of different countries have presented aspects and approaches of SAAV. These contributions and the discussions led to key issues, which will be in the focus of the 2017 AVS breakout session on Safety Assurance.
Starting with a 5-10 min stimulation presentation, we would motivate the audience to be ready for discussions. In 15-20 min discussions, we will find more about the opinions of the audience and would gather their proposals.

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Breakout 18:
Reading the Road Ahead: Infrastructure Readiness

Today’s automated vehicles collect primary guidance information from visible-light optical imagery machine vision equipment supported by complementary sensors and integrated with global navigation satellite systems. Without consistently-placed traffic control devices and geometric design, these cloud-supported multi-client machine learning systems will struggle to operate with predictable accuracy. This points to the need to determine the suitability of roadway segments for AV operations in support of the fast-emerging ubiquity of Level II and para-Level III AV systems and in preparation for consistent implementations of Level IV and Level V systems.

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Breakout 19:
SHARK TANK – Change is Coming: Who Will Survive?

Automated vehicles provide a classic example of disruptive innovation. Change will be non-linear in nature (difficult to predict impacts with precision) and likely to generate new markets and new ways to provide traditional transportation services. Implications cover economic and social changes, well beyond those of traditional transportation investments.

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Breakout 20:
Making Automation Work for Cities

The session will discuss the status of automation planning/ implementation in cities in the the US and in Europe. We shall also identify priority activities to create an enabling policy framework for transport automation that contributes to meeting key urban policy goals. The primary target group for this breakout session are urban/ metropolitan planners and policy makers, as well as potential implementers of automation technology in cities and regions.

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Breakout 21:
Connected and Automated Vehicles in Traffic Signal Systems

The goal of this two-part breakout session is to explore opportunities for new approaches to control of signalized intersections (or more broadly controlled junctions) for CAV. This session explores the role of infrastructure and the vehicle in decision making and control decisions and how vehicles and the infrastructure can cooperate to safely and efficiently operate the intersection of roadways.

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Breakout 22:
Legal and Policy Approaches: Finding the Right Balance on Legislating for Automated Vehicles

States are taking different approaches towards developing and enacting legislation specific to automated vehicles (AV). While some have defined clear and explicit rules for testing and operation of AVs on public roads, others have adopted a more ‘hands-off’ approach and avoided legislating in this area. Last year, the U.S. Department of Transportation released a model state policy to guide state and local agencies. In addition, several legal associations have started their own initiatives on developing model state legislation regarding AVs. The goal of this session is to bring together the various groups working on or influencing legislation development and to dive into a discussion on how to develop a framework and potentially desirable elements of effective legislation for AVs.

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Breakout 23:
Connected Automated Vehicle Early Deployment Alternatives

The objective of this break-out session is to identify the research topics that must be addressed to overcome the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities from using connected automation to improve transportation operations. Break-out sessions in previous AVS events have focused on Connected Level 1 Automation, i.e., connected longitudinal control, by means of V2V or V2I. This session will continue by briefly introducing two promising applications: (1) Cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) for freeway operations and (2) Eco-approach and departure (EAD) to signalized intersections, and will describe ongoing research progress by government and industry toward developing them for possible future deployment. The test facilities and test progress for early CACC prototypes will be described. Finally, results of simulation studies of CACC for application to realistic traffic scenarios will be presented. A general discussion will then be followed by collaborative identification of research gaps that will lead to outlines of possible Research Needs Problem Statements for consideration by TRB committees as products of the breakout session.

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Breakout 24:
Automated Vehicles for People with Disabilities

For people with disabilities and older adults, inadequate mobility and transportation can hinder them from completing important tasks, such as obtaining employment, commuting to appointments, or even attending social events that many take for granted. In 2010, the U.S. Census reported that approximately 56.7 million people in the U.S. had some type of disability. The USDOT’s ATTRI Program leverages recent advances in vehicle, infrastructure, and pedestrian-based technologies, as well as accessible data, mobile computing, robotics, artificial intelligence, object detection, and navigation. These technologies are enabled by ever present wireless communications that connect travelers and their mobile devices, vehicles, and roadside infrastructure.

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Breakout 25:
Ethical and Social Implications

This breakout will examine the ethical and social challenges of vehicle automation beyond the legal, policy, and technical issues discussed in other sessions. Experts will discuss the ethics behind routine driving decisions, industry responses to the ethics requirement in NHTSA’s guidelines, and approaches to similar ethics challenges in other fields.

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